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Elle Decor Italia

Romola, super-marble restaurant fights against crisis in Madrid

Andres Jaque designs futuristic and intriguing restaurant inspired to old lush cafeterias in Madrid to struggle against Austerity

marble-restaurant-madrid-romola
© Miguel de Guzmán y Rocío Romero. Imagen Subliminal

A “marble-made tent in the galaxy”, so architecture studio Andres Jaque describes its latest creation – Romola –, a new futuristic restaurant recently inaugurated in the very heart of Madrid. Set inside a 1946’s former garage, the venue blends cutting-edge technology and experimental design and benefits from large openings at street level. Ceilings reach the incredible height of 5 metres and provide loads of room for the marble bonanza to steal the stage.

Read also → Il nuovo showroom Laufen by Patricia Urquiola a Madrid

© Miguel de Guzmán y Rocío Romero. Imagen Subliminal

Promoting quite an unconventional take on interior design, Andres Jaque opted for employing a material as noble as marble and rejected the more austere, overly used hydraulic tiles and red ceramic bricks which have turned increasingly popular in Madrid cafes after the financial crisis hit the country back in 2008. “Down with impersonal, cold and shabby bars that look like mess halls!”:  here’s the motto of such – how to put it – slightly dissident project. The goal? To elevate the past and look straight to the future, without fearing to show off high quality and excellence. 

Read also → La torre di Madrid trasformata in hotel

@ Miguel de Guzmán y Rocío Romero. Imagen Subliminal

Romola is decorated with rare marble types and their stunning textures coming straight from Novelda (Valencia), a district featuring a number of caves and artisan masters which were long forgotten until Andres Jaque got back to trigger a bunch of – now dormant but very popular back in the day – marble caves back to life. Working side by side with well-seasoned craftsmen, the marble slabs were transformed into an actual self-standing tent accommodating the customers’ tables and seats, along with the kitchen. If the use of high-end materials pays homage to the glorious legacy of 20th-century’s traditional cafeterias – meaning sophisticated and posh environments that offered an alternative to the more masculine, typical bars –, this architectural response is also matched with a truly experimental and innovative approach

© Miguel de Guzmán y Rocío Romero. Imagen Subliminal

Take advanced technology, which here stands at the core of a compelling, unprecedented engineering system: glass fiber and resin reinforcements are attached to the marble slabs, thus generating articulated anchoring systems that turn the material a sort of “super marble” capable of resisting both compression and traction. 

Read also → Una boutique tra moda, arte e design nel cuore di Madrid

© Miguel de Guzmán y Rocío Romero. Imagen Subliminal

By bringing high-end materials back to attention – the same once banned at times of Austerity –, designers conceived a playful palette featuring rare-wood panels, leather upholsteries, chrome-plated metal finishes and artisanal varnishes, so popular in the 1960s Golden Age of Madrid cafeterias. The custom-made furniture selection results from the mix of precious materials and masterful craftsmanship, topped by a hint of vibrant colours meant to provide customers with a cheerful, openly anti-crisis, environment.

 

© Miguel de Guzmán y Rocío Romero. Imagen Subliminal

www.romola.es

andresjaque.net


by Elisa Zagaria / 9 January 2018

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