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Elle Decor Italia

4 design Christmas tree will make you dream of having them at home

From the upside down tree to the paper tree: the Christmas fir is decked by artists and designers

4 Christmas trees in London

Photo courtesy Joe Humphrys, Tate Photography

Ahead of the 25th of December, London is yet again set to be one of the most luring touristic spots, whipped up as it is as the magic of Christmas kicks in. Among the initiatives taking stage in the City, the traditional Christmas tree installed in infamous luxury hotels and museums were commissioned to artists and creatives.

 

Maybe they won’t be the easiest pie – replicating one at your own house could be quite a challenge-  but those Christmas trees surely offer some ideas to shake off the old of your traditional festivities: and so say goodbye to the glittery red balls systematically brought to life from their dusty boxes and scattered over the conventional spruce  (if you are looking for newness for Christmas, click here The nativity calendar goes naked ).

 Among the new, the Christmas tree at the Tate Britain was designed by artist Shirazeh Houshiary and created in collaboration with the Lisson Gallery. For the first time, this year the building (which was refurbished by Caruso St John) will host a Christmas tree (read also  The Tate Britain as you have never seen it before). Playing on with the natural features of the fir – robustness, full green colour, pointed shape and the soft smell are all distinctive nods to the Christmas spirit – the tree hangs upside down from the ceiling, taking centre stage at the very entrance, where the spiral staircase stands, to show off the gilded leaves plated roots and “bring the earth on heaven”, the artist says. The location was originally picked out to offer the visitors new perspectives of the three storeys gallery: the point of the tree at the ground floor, the body hanging from the ceiling and the glossy roots lighting up the upper floor.

 

Photo courtesy Joe Humphrys, Tate Photography

No secondary is The Body Parts, the Christmas tree designed by the fashion brand JW Anderson and displayed at the restaurant Hoi Polloi, inside the ACE Hotel in Shoreditch, to celebrate Anderson’s one year anniversary at the Hotel. 

Decked with classic monogram fantasies, logos and images inspired by the traditional statues (you can find it here  JW Anderson in the new store So in Milan), the Christmas tree was named after the exhibition Disobedient Bodies, which will be showcased at the Hepworth Wakefield in Yorkshire, in 2017 to explore the strong bond that ties fashion designers and artists of the XX and XXI century to the human being.

 

Photo by Andrew Meredith

 

There i salso Three by Fabrica,designed by Alexis Gallo, Mariana Fernandes and Sílvia Matias, from the Venetian università to adorn the lobby of the ACE hotel.

The three artists of the Trevigian collective gave birth to the most original Christmas tree built with a variety of materials: gift paper, flakes and stickers, pencil and decorations. The main colour sparks yellow touches, together with a series of comics that send merry and cheerful wishes for the Christmas’ holidays (“adopt a dear” or “switch off your phone this Christmas” are among the suggestions), and also projects that will be on display for the whole month of December.

Photo by Andrew Meredith

Keeping on with luxury hotels’ trees, indulge yourself with the spruce standing at the Connaught Hotel, right at the outdoor square and designed by the British sculptor Antony Gormley. A majestic 17,5 meters tall cedar trunk acts as a sparkling column around which leaves moves with the wind in a ever ending dance. As in the Tate, the creative process starts from the body of the tree itself, where the fir’s nucleon was lit to convey a sense of continuity and livelihood.

Last but not least, the Christmas tree designed by Jonathan Ive and Marc Newson for the lobby at the Claridge's Hotel, demands a feature of its own → The most awaited Christmas tree in London

 

 


by Valentina Mariani / 19 December 2016

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